Terrible nuke stuff going on in northern Saskatchewan

Audio link below.  From Before it’s news:

Pact with the Nuclear Devil: Saskatchewan’s Uranium Companies Derogate First Nations Land Rights

“So here to us was an immediate gag order… How come if I’m in opposition to the mining companies that this negotiation would rob me the ability to speak out my concerns to the leadership or to my own people, my own community, and my own municipality.” Dale Smith

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Length (58:55)
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Dale Smith is a Métis resident of Pinehouse, a community in the boreal forest 500 kilometres north of Saskatoon in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. Pinehouse is one of those Northern Saskatchewan communities targeted by the nuclear industry for its proximity to uranium deposits and to a site for the dumping of nuclear waste from Ontario.

In the fall of 2012, news of a Collaboration Agreement between the community of Pinehouse and uranium companies Cameco and Pinehouse began to surface. Community members like Smith became outraged not only by the lack of meaningful consultation, but by the terms of the agreement.

Confidentiality Clause

A summary of the Collaboration Agreement Term Sheet became available to community members at a November 13, 2012 public village meeting. The text directly implies that the village residents would effectively be subjected to a gag order:

Summary of the Collaboration Agreement Term Sheet Made Among Cameco Corporation, Areva Resources Canada Inc. and Pinehouse (“Term Sheet”)
October 12, 2012

Section G: Other Promises

Pinehouse Promises to:

(a) Generally cooperate with Cameco/Areva and generally support Cameco/Areva operations when it deals with the provincial or federal governments although Pinehouse can raise concerns to the governments about the projects.
….

(e) Not make statements or say things in public or to any government, business or agency that opposes Cameco/Areva’s mining operations.

(f) Make reasonable efforts to ensure Pinehouse members do not say or do anything that interferes with or delays Cameco/Areva’s mining, or do or say anything that is not consistent with Pinehouse’s promises under the Collaboration Agreement. [1]

Outrage from the community and negative media exposure resulted in the wording of the text being altered to omit the gag order provisions. However, in the final draft it became apparent that another signatory, Kineepik Métis Local Inc., representing Métis peoples in the town, had obtained records dealing with traditional land use mapping fishing, trapping and other resource utilization in the area. [2]

The executive, it seems, had agreed to share this information with Cameco/Areva so that compensation for lands encroached upon by the nuclear giants could be negotiated. In exchange, Pinehouse Village Trust would receive an intitial payment of $1 million with additional payments pending as new mining projects initiate operation.[3][4]

The final Collaboration Agreement between Pinehouse, Cameco and Areva was signed December 12, 2012.

In Dale Smith’s words: “They bought Pinehouse outright.”

On June 24, 2013, Larry Kowalchuk of Kowalchuk Law Office in Regina registered a statement of claim in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan’s Court of Queen’s Bench on behalf of Smith and two other litigants backed by three dozen other plaintiffs across Canada.

The suit argued the mining operations fostered by the Collaboration Agreement would have a detrimental impact on human health and the environment. The suit also named the Saskatchewan and Canadian governments as not protecting Aboriginal and Treaty rights enshrined under the Canadian Constitution, the Charter of Rights and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. [5]

The legal battle is a difficult one for Smith. Not only is he at the centre of a classic David and Goliath duel, but he finds himself pitted against friends and family within his village with few of his loved ones willing to take to the public stage alongside him.

This week’s Global Research News Hour gives space for this humble wild rice harvester and fisherman turned defender of the land to tell his story.

For more information on this story visit the Committee for Future Generations Website
or D’Arcy Hande’s latest contribution to Briarpatch magazine – “Courting collaboration: How the uranium industry bought the Village of Pinehouse, and what residents are doing to take it back

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Length (58:55)
Click to download the audio (MP3 format)

Notes

1) http://committeeforfuturegenerations.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/collaborationagreement.pdf
2) D’Arcy Hande, Nov. 1, 2013; “Courting collaboration: How the uranium industry bought the Village of Pinehouse, and what residents are doing to take it back”, Briarpatch Magazine; http://briarpatchmagazine.com/articles/view/courting-collaboration
3) ibid
4) COLLABORATION AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE NORTHERN VILLAGE OF PINEHOUSE AND KINEEPIK METIS LOCAL INC. AND CAMECO CORPORATION
AND AREVA RESOURCES CANADA INC. Dated December 12
http://www.pinehouselake.ca/images/pdf/Collaboration%20Agreement.pdf
5) D’Arcy Hande, op cit.

WTF? A Poem?

WTF?

A bunch of racist sexist homophobic nutbarsGOP nazis
spreading shit like this is somehow okay
in the land of the free, home of the brave?

Prenatal Nondiscrimination Act (PRENDA) pretends
to prevent race-based abortions, steals from
the civil rights legacy to curb choice

and slams Planned Parenthood in its bid
to serve adherents of white supremacist ideas.

How interesting that Malcolm X and MLK
supported women’s reproductive freedom.

 

c. 2012-02-06 Politics’n’Poetry

Navajo Leads Uranium Roundtable on Capitol Hill

I don’t want to believe that the MSM is corrupt as it is, but, well, give them enough rope…

Anyway, from Native American Times, a report on a meeting, one you’re not likely going to hear about in the MSM:

Navajo Leads Uranium Roundtable on Capitol Hill

WASHINGTON, D.C.
11/14/2007

Three members of Congress joined the Navajo Nation last week in a discussion on the ban of uranium mining on the Navajo Nation.

“Over a half century ago the United States government faced by the threats of the Cold War began a massive effort to mine and process uranium ore for use in the country’s nuclear weapons programs,” said Navajo Nation President Joe Shirley, as he gave his opening statement at the Rayburn House Office building on Capitol Hill. “Much of that uranium was mine on, or near, Navajo lands and much of it extracted and processed with Navajo hands.”

The Uranium Roundtable, held jointly by the Navajo Nation and Congress, was an open discussion for Navajo leadership and community members affected by uranium mining to come together with Congress and federal agencies.

Federal government agencies represented at the Roundtable included the Indian Health Services, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Department of Energy.

“Workers, families, and their neighbors suffer increased incidences of cancers and other medical disorders caused by their exposure to uranium,” said President Shirley. “Fathers and sons who went to work in the mins and the processing facilities brought the remnants of uranium in to their homes at the end of the day infecting their families.”

The Roundtable was hosted by Congressman Tom Udall, D-NM-3, who chaired and lead the discussion of the forum.

“We gather today to engage in a discussion of the very serious issues facing the Navajo Nation as a result of uranium development,” said Congressman Udall. “This is an opportunity for all parties to come together to outline specific steps that Congress, federal agencies, and the Navajo Nation can take toward rectifying past wrongs, and creating safer communities in the Navajo Nation.”

Congressmen Jim Matheson, D-UT-2, and Rick Renzi, R-AZ-1, participated in the three hour forum attended by more than 60 people, including many from the Navajo Nation, and the neighboring town of Grants, New Mexico.

During the Roundtable, Congressman Renzi asked Dr. Charles Miller of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission about the process of permits for mining uranium on the Navajo Nation.

“Our approach is to carry out the review of the license,” responded Dr. Miller, explaining that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is seated with responsibility to conduct a review of granting permits for uranium mining. He further explained that their process does not prohibit the Navajo Nation from enforcing Navajo laws to stop uranium mining.

In 2005, the Navajo Nation Council passed the Diné Natural Resources Protection Act, which places a ban on uranium mining on Navajo lands.

Other Navajo leaders who participated in the Roundtable included Council Delegate Phil Harrison of Red Valley and Cove Chapters. Harrison, a member of the Navajo Nation Council Committee on Natural Resources, spoke on the contamination of uranium mining in Navajo communities.

“We’re talking about a situation that is occurring today in places like Tuba City, and other places throughout Navajo Indian country,” said Harrison. “The experiment on our health and welfare, being conducted with the complicity of the United States government continues.”

Watch for PMS and Brad Wall to continue with their “experiments” based in ecological racism on the First Nations communities in Saskatchewan’s north.

Uranium Blockade and Protest starts Algonquin Canoe Protest

Uranium Blockade and Protest starts Algonquin Canoe Protest
September 18th, 2007 – 11:00 EDT
Algonquin first Nations at Ardoch and Sharbot Lake will descend the
Mississippi watershed on a traditional canoe journey to deliver a strong
unified message to declare a moratorium on proposed uranium mining in
all their territory.
Event: Saturday, September 22nd – A traditional birch bark canoe and
escort canoes launch from Ardoch Ontario to take water from Crotch Lake
and will transport 2 Algonquin maidens as ‘Water Carriers’ to pour out an
urgent message about uranium to the Government of Canada.
Event: Tuesday, September 25th – Rally and reception in Carleton Place
and Almonte, key towns on the Mississippi that are directly downstream
from the potential uranium mining contamination.
Event: Thursday, September 27th – Gathering of all protest canoes and
kayaks at Victoria Island (sacred to the Algonquin) in Ottawa to prepare for
a final Portage to Parliament Hill. There will be a ‘Ceremonial Signing’ of a
declaration for a moratorium on uranium mining by the Algonquin Chiefs.
Event: Friday, September 28th Native and Non-Native people of the Ottawa
and Mississippi valleys will gather for the ‘Final Portage and Rally’ on
Parliament Hill to declare to the Canadian and Ontario Provincial
Government an immediate moratorium on uranium mining. The
proclamation will be read in Algonquin with English and French translations
available.
OTTAWA, ONTARIO, EVENT ANNOUNCEMENT – The gathering of all
that stand against the mining of uranium and the mining laws will be at
Victoria Island on the afternoon and evening of 27th September. The ‘ Final
Portage & Rally ‘ will proclaim Native and Non-Native support for the
moratorium on uranium mining.
A Public Energy Forum (“Power to Choose”) at the Odawa Friendship
Center (12 Stirling Avenue, Ottawa) after the Canoe Protest.
Grand Chief Grandfather William Commanda, Chief Doreen Davis of the
Shabot Obaadjiwan, Chiefs Randy Cota, Paula Sherman and Harold Perry
and Bob Lovelace of the Ardoch Algonquin Nation will be on hand to
express their position and answer questions on the uranium mining issue.

More information can be found on the event website at:
and http://ato.smartcapital.ca/actcity
IN: Native Protest, Energy, Environment, Health, Uranium Mining, Politics
CONTACT INFORMATION
David Gill Phone:
(Day)613-943 9434
(Eve)613 288 8034
Mobile: 613-290 5790
E-mail: divadllig@hotmail.com
E2-mail : actcityottawa@gmail.com
http://ato.smartcapital.ca/actcity

Sharbot Lake Uranium Mystery

Hey Ontario, before you go to the polls maybe you should read up on the Sharbot Lake mystery, starting with this:

Frontenac never specifically stated how they got this permit from the Ontario government or how this colonial interloper ever gained the right to give anyone such a permit. Even in cases where there have been treaties, Canada’s Indian Affairs department has usually recognized that the indigenous peoples retain underground mineral rights. In this case, the Algonquins never surrendered the land in question. Ontario’s authority is based on pure presumption. It looks like outrighttheft from the Algonquins, who are being kept in the dark.

from:  The Answer, My Friend, is Glowing in the Wind…unravelling the Sharbot Lake Uranium mystery over at Harper Valley

First Nation blocks access to mining firm to protect their lands and waters

A couple of weeks ago the Ardoch and Shabot Obaadjiwan Algonquin First Nation in Eastern Ontario stated they would not participate in the court process which ignored their right to lands which may soon be mined for uranium.  They issued a public letter to Premier Dalton McGinty to seek his “intervention in the impasse that currently exists with respect to uranium exploration in Algonquin territory. ” From the CBC:

Two First Nations communities being sued for blocking potential uranium development at a site in eastern Ontario have told Premier Dalton McGuinty they are quitting the court process and won’t leave the area even if ordered to do so by a judge.

On Saturday, September 1, the first Nations communities kept their word.  From the Kingston Whig Standard, a.k.a. Osprey media:

The court order was delivered verbally by a sheriff standing on the road in front of the crowd, most of whom were blocking the mine entrance. As the sheriff issued the order, the crowd drummed, chanted and yelled.

Shabot Obaadjiwan war chief Earl Badour, who oversees the security of the protesters at the site, said he met the officers with a group of about 24 warriors.

“I said to them we were not speaking,” said Badour.

Badour then signalled for the native flag to be turned upside down as a symbolic gesture that “all natives are in distress. And the government has put them all in distress,” he said.

The First Nations Statement of Defence and counterclaim is here.  This will be an important struggle to watch in terms of First Nations land claims and the rabid nuclear industry.

Govt of Sk Ass-kissing Oil & Gas

It seems the back-assward Sask NDP are proud to invest more money in the oil and gas industry at a time when oil and gas are being recognized as great contributors to global warming. It’s economic racism, I think, to put First Nations people into this situation.

But you go figure, because I give up trying to figure out this bunch of red-necked neo-cons that call themselves progressive and kiss-ass the corporate sector!

FUNDING DELIVERED IN NORTHWEST TO PURSUE BUSINESS AND EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES IN OIL AND GAS – Government of Saskatchewan

 

People in northwest Saskatchewan will soon be better equipped to investigate business opportunities and find employment in Saskatchewan’s booming oil and gas industries. Canada’s New Government and the Government of Saskatchewan are providing a total of $1.67 million to the Meadow Lake Tribal Council (MLTC) to implement three projects in the area of business development and employment training.

The investment was announced today by Saskatchewan First Nations & Métis Relations Minister Maynard Sonntag, on behalf of Industry and Resources Minister Eric Cline and Northern Affairs Minister Joan Beatty, and the Honourable Rona Ambrose, President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada, Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs and Minister of Western Economic Diversification.

“It is important that our governments help First Nations and Metis peoples and northerners take advantage of opportunities in their regions and make the most of our strong economy,” Sonntag said. “These projects will contribute to northern development and lead to a better quality of life for people in this area.”

“Canada’s New Government is proud to invest over $1.3 million in these projects which will give residents of northern Saskatchewan, including First Nations people, the resources and training they need to capitalize on the increasing business and employment prospects in oil and gas,” said Minister Ambrose. “We are proud to get things done for the residents of northern Saskatchewan by working in partnership with other orders of government.”

The largest project, involving $1.4 million, will provide the MLTC funds to establish an Oil and Gas Secretariat to pursue emerging business opportunities in the oil and gas sector on behalf of its members. The other two projects will provide job training to northerners seeking employment on oil drilling rigs or as heavy equipment operators in the oil, gas, mining or construction industries.

Meadow Lake Tribal Council represents nine First Nations in northwestern Saskatchewan with a combined membership of 11,000. According to tribal Chief Helen Ben, oil and gas initiatives will provide MLTC members with additional employment, training and business opportunities. “We have been fortunate in the past to become significant players in the forest industry and this new funding will help us to become involved with an even larger industry. We realize that the real effort will be made by the young men and women who are still in school today, getting a better education and better training. But we know they can do it and our Tribal council intends to be there to help.”

“Investments made into training programs under the Northern Development Agreement are providing access to gainful employment for Northerners in all sectors,” Northern Development Board chair Al Rivard said. “Early results of the oil and gas exploration in northern Saskatchewan are encouraging, these training programs provide northern residents with transferable skills so that once this new exciting sector comes to fruition, we will have trained northerners ready and willing to take on these new opportunities.”

Funding for the MLTC capacity building project is being provided through the Canada-Saskatchewan Western Economic Partnership Agreement. This Agreement funds initiatives that increase Aboriginal participation in the economic mainstream, develop Saskatchewan’s small and medium-sized business sector, support economic and technological innovation, and assist with diversifying Saskatchewan’s economy. This contribution reinforces the commitment of both governments to increase First Nations involvement in the development of Saskatchewan’s non-renewable resources.

The drilling rig and heavy equipment operator programs are receiving funding from the Canada-Saskatchewan Northern Development Agreement (NDA). The NDA is providing $20 million over six years (2002 to 2008) for a variety of northern economic development initiatives. About $13.8 million has been announced to date to support 43 projects. In addition to a broad range of training and employment programs, the Agreement has invested in expanding high-speed Internet service to more than 35 northern communities.

-30-

For more information, contact:

Brenda Tarasiuk
Western Economic Diversification Canada
Saskatoon
Phone: 306-975-5943
Email: www.wd.gc.ca
Cell: 1-888-338-WEST

Bob Ellis
Saskatchewan Industry and Resources
Regina
Phone: 306-787-1691

Scott Boyes
Saskatchewan Northern Affairs
La Ronge
Phone: 306-425-6669
Email: sboyes@sna.gov.sk.ca
Cell: 306-425-8869

Gordon Iron
Meadow Lake Tribal Council
Meadow Lake
Phone: 306-236-5654

Dean Desjarlais
Northern Development Board
La Ronge
Phone: 306-425-2444
Email: ceo.ndbc@sasktel.net