Nukers lobbied to have Keen fired?

Remember the Chalk River Scandal?  Remember how we got a taste of just how much Harper hates “uppity women”?  Remember how he treated Linda Keen, how he and his cronies fired her for no real reason?

Well, thanks to intrepid reporter, Greg Weston, of Sun Media, P’n’P has learned that

industry insiders say lobbyists had long been trying to get rid of Keen for reasons that had nothing to do with medicine. Their clients were companies that stand to make huge money from the next generation of Canadian nuclear power reactors called the Advanced Candu, or ACR-1000. Rightly or wrongly, it seems, the iron-fisted Keen was getting in the way.

Keen would not agree to conduct a special review of AECL’s new toy design.  But, exit Keen and enter Binder and everything changed!

Almost immediately after Binder took over from Keen, the supposedly independent, quasi-judicial safety commission reversed itself and agreed to conduct a pre-project review of Atomic Energy’s new ACR-1000 reactor design.

Seven months later, the commission concluded its review, finding the new Candu complies with “regulatory requirements and meets the expectations for new nuclear power plants in Canada.”

It’s  like, well, it’s like MAGIC! Or something, eh?

Thanks to BCer in Toronto for pointing me to the article!

2 thoughts on “Nukers lobbied to have Keen fired?

  1. Way back in July 2007 before Keen got canned :

    “The federal government is reportedly in advanced negotiations with U.S. industrial giant General Electric Co. to sell a large share of Crown-owned Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd.

    Natural Resources Minister Gary Lunn has been leading the privatization discussions along with AECL’s new chair Michael Burns, the Toronto Star has learned.

    “Lunn is driving this himself,” said one source close to GE. “GE is very confident that this is a done deal.”

    Lunn and other federal officials met with Areva’s Paris-based CEO Ann Lauvergeon, considered the most powerful businesswoman in France, and Areva Canada president Armand Laferrere on June 19 to discuss Areva’s role in the Canadian nuclear industry and its willingness to invest in AECL, according to a source connected to the meeting.

    Sources point to the recent decision by AECL chief executive Robert Van Adel to retire in November, well before his contract expires, as a sign that the federal government is determined to get a deal done by year’s end.

    Industry officials say Van Adel has strongly opposed any partnership between AECL and Areva. They point out, however, that the government may have called a meeting with the Areva executives after Prime Minister Stephen Harper talked about nuclear power issues with French President Nicholas Sarkozy on June 5 at a meeting of G8 leaders.

    Laferrere was a personal adviser of Sarkozy when the French president was minister of interior between 2002 and 2004. Sarkozy, personal friends with Lauvergeon, is reportedly keen on expanding and privatizing Areva’s global nuclear business.”

    ~ The Record

  2. Whooee! I give Weston credit for doggin’ this bone. I wrote to him last week telling him so, too.

    The other reason I wrote Weston last week was to tell him he was in error in his column. He said that Areva has built 100 new generation reactors. In fact, they have built none. They have two under construction: one in Finland and one in France. Areva’s vast experience with these new type reactors was Weston’s chief reason for touting Areva over AECL. He didn’t reply.

    I would have though he’d get Linda Keen’s name spelled correctly, too. It was spelled wrong throughout this new piece.

    JB

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