No Nukes Organizing in Paradise (Hill)!

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> http://www.meridianbooster.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=1473272
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> Nuclear reaction
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> Meeting draws hundreds in nuclear debate
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> Posted By Graham Mason
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> More than 400 people crowded into the Kinsmen Hall in Paradise Hill Monday night to hear what former University of Regina professor Jim Harding had to say about the dangers of nuclear power.
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> The meeting was organized by a group called Save Our Saskatchewan, which was formed last month by residents concerned about the prospect of a Bruce Power nuclear plant being stationed somewhere in the region along the North Saskatchewan River.
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> Harding criticized the company for downplaying the environmental cost of building and fueling the plant while grouping it with wind and solar energy.
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> “When you say something is green, it doesn’t make it green,” Harding told the crowd. “It’s true that a nuclear power plant doesn’t emit carbon, but everything else does along the nuclear fuel chain.”
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> “The promotions are one-sided, they dis-inform by omitting.”
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> He accused the company and provincial government of deception in selling nuclear power to the public.
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> “Unfortunately, some of us aren’t people of our word, words are manipulated so much. There’s so much spin going on here that we all have to start taking a deep breath and wonder whether we’re hearing anything at all,” said Harding. “They’re just asking each other to come to each other’s events to animate support to make it look like public opinion supports this.”
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> No representatives from Bruce Power attended the meeting, but in a telephone interview with the Booster, company spokesperson Steve Cannon responded to the criticism.
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> “At this point it’s too early for anybody to be making a decision of any kind,” said Cannon. “What we’re asking is that people in Saskatchewan take a step back from some of the rhetoric and just look at the facts of it.
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> “If, at the end of the day, you have good facts, good information, and you still don’t support the technology – we respect that, we understand that.”
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> Cannon said Bruce Power would continue talking to landowners before making any decision on a final site for an environmental assessment, reiterating no specific site has yet been chosen.
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> ”I know some people have tried to draw that inference because we’ve been speaking to landowners but that’s just not the case,” he said.
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> Daron Priest farms in an area near one of the landowners contacted by the company.
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> “One of the proposed sites is very close to our farm, and I’ve got some real concerns and even more so tonight after listening to the speakers,” said Priest. “There are a lot of concerned people I think.”
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> Meggan Hougham, secretary of SOS, was pleased with the turnout in Paradise Hill.
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> “There was a good discussion and lots of good questions and we couldn’t have been happier,” said Hougham. “(The group is just) local people in response to hearing a power plant was proposed for the area just concerned and they wanted to do something about it.
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> Harding told the audience the only truly green option was renewable energy such as wind and solar, which don’t require toxic metals as fuel or water as a coolant.
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> “(Bruce Power’s) own polls show overwhelming support for going the renewable route,” said Harding. “When did you ever get an energy source that could be a health policy, a water policy, as well as an energy policy?”
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> Cannon said the environmental cost of nuclear is diminished by its long lifecycle.
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> “Where does a wind turbine come from, where does the steal come from, the process to build solar panels, to build windmills, the material is all mined, it’s all refined, it’s the same type of thing,” he said.
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> According to the company, construction of the plant would create 20,000 direct and indirect jobs, and when complete, the plant will provide 1,000 full-time jobs and 900 indirect jobs over 60 years.
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> Even though this would be Bruce Power’s first reactor built from the ground up, Cannon said the company is up to the task.
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> “We’re well versed in what this would require,” he said. “We’ve already restarted two reactors and we’ve got another project underway now to restart two more and in a way that’s even more challenging and complex than if we built right from scratch.”
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> He admitted that the power output of the proposed plant was more than enough to meet the province’s domestic needs, but pointed out that there was a demand in neighbouring jurisdictions. He also dismissed Harding’s claim that nuclear power spelled a major health risk.
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> “It does a disservice to the highly educated people who work in the industry and live near the facilities to believe that we would ever choose to live here and work in an industry that poses a cancer risk for us, it’s just not the case,” said Cannon. “It’s a scare tactic to be quite frank, but it’s a question that people have and we understand it.”
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> “I think people just have to do research on that and find out the true facts for themselves,” he said.
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> A public meeting on nuclear power will be held in Lloydminster March 19 at the Wayside Inn.

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