Iraqi Refugees Forced into Prostitution

I guess oil is soooo important that women and girls lives don’t really matter to GWB & Co…

http://news.independent.co.uk/world/middle_east/article2701324.ece
The Independent on Sunday ~~ June 24, 2007
‘50,000 Iraqi refugees’ forced into prostitution
Women and girls, many alarmingly young, who fled the chaos at home are
being further betrayed after reaching ‘safety’ in Syria
By Nihal Hassan in Damascus

It’s Monday night in a dingy club on the outskirts of the Syrian
capital. Two dozen girls are moving half-heartedly on the dance floor,
lit up by flashing disco lights.

They are dessed in tight jeans, low-cut tops and knee-high boots, but
the girls’ make-up can’t disguise the fact that most are in their
mid-teens. It’s a strange sight in a conservative Muslim country, but
this is the sex business, and it’s booming as a result of the war in Iraq.

Backstage, the manager sits in his leather chair, doing business. A
Saudi client is quoted $500 for one of the girls. Eventually he beats
it down to $300. Next door, in a dimly lit room, the next shift of
girls arrives, taking off the black all-covering abayasthey wear
outside and putting on lipstick and mascara.

To judge from the cars parked outside, the clients come from all over
the Gulf region – many are young Saudi men escaping from an even more
conservative moral climate. But the Syrian friend who has brought me
here tells me that 95 per cent of the girls are Iraqi.

Most are unwilling to talk, but Zahra, an attractive girl with a bare
midriff and tattoos, tells me she’s 16. She has been working in this
club since fleeing to Syria from Baghdad after the war. She doesn’t
like it, she says, “but what can we do? I hope things get better in
Iraq, because I miss it. I want to go back, but I have to look after
my sister”. Zahra points to a thin, pubescent girl with long black
hair, who seems to be dancing quite happily. Aged 13, Nadia started in
the club two months ago.

As the girls dance suggestively, allowing their breasts to brush
against each other, one winks at a customer. But these girls are not
just providing the floor show – they have paid to be here, and they
need to pick up a client, or they’ll lose money. If successful,
they’ll earn about $60, equivalent to a month’s wages in a factory.

There are more than a million Iraqi refugees in Syria, many are women
whose husbands or fathers have been killed. Banned from working
legally, they have few options outside the sex trade. No one knows how
many end up as prostitutes, but Hana Ibrahim, founder of the Iraqi
women’s group Women’s Will, puts the figure at 50,000.

I met Fatima in a block of flats operating informally as a brothel in
Saida Zainab, a run-down area with a large Iraqi population. Millions
of Shias go there every year, because of the shrine of the prophet
Mohamed’s granddaughter. “I came to Syria after my husband was killed,
leaving me with two children,” Fatima tells me. “My aunt asked me to
join her here, and my brothers pressured me to go.” She didn’t realise
the work her aunt did, and she would be forced to take up, until she arrived.

Fatima is in her mid-20s, but campaigners say the number of Iraqi
children working as prostitutes is high. Bassam al-Kadi of Syrian
Women Observatory says: “Some have been sexually abused in Iraq, but
others are being prostituted by fathers and uncles who bring them here
under the pretext of protecting them. They are virgins, and they are
brought here like an investment and exploited in a very ugly way.”

Further viewing: Nihal Hassan and Nima Elbagir’s report will appear on
‘More 4 News’ at 8pm tomorrow

Advertisements

7 thoughts on “Iraqi Refugees Forced into Prostitution

  1. Perhaps Polly but the military isn’t anywhere near this problem, If these women were allowed to work then they wouldn’t have to do this to survive. The problem is muslim culture and their oppression of women in general.

  2. No the military is no where near this problem now. These women and children are displaced persons because of “war” and the military industrial complex machine of Western making. Their husbands and/or their fathers were killed, thus putting them in a situation of destitution.
    As refugees in Syria, first do they even have the privelege to “work”? In Canada, they would not until have became landed immigrants. Second, their ability to find other employment that actually paid a living wage is hampered by their gender and lack of skills. What is the employment situation in Syria?
    Third, by default, prostitution is chosen to feed their families.
    For all the propaganda about bringing freedom and democracy to Iraq and or Afghanistan for that matter, it seems that – in this regard – yes, freedom to choose between prostitution or not feeding your children.
    I am sure that in Syria with the dramatic increase in unemployed refugees – who might not be able to legally work – that the viable option – to feed their families – is prostition.

  3. The problem is muslim culture and their oppression of women in general.

    This is a vile lie, and it is furthermore sheer chutzpah.

    Women in much of Iraq, certainly in urban centres, the women who have fled to Syria, were for decades among the most liberated women in the region, well educated, free of religious oppression. One of the most horrible results of the illegal invasion and the continuing illegal occupation has been to destroy any hope that such a culture can be re-established in Iraq for at least a generation, probably longer.

  4. The problem is exploitation of women and girls. This oppression is a worldwide human rights violation, regardless of culture or religion. This is not a partisan issue. Many conservative Republican women like myself are devoted to fighting this form of terrorism.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s